Is There Such a Thing as a “Safe Discharge Plan”?

A typical scenario is that an elderly person takes a fall at home. Whether or not there are resulting fractures, the family and/or physician is afraid to discharge the person back home because now, since having had a fall, the person is deemed unsafe at home. Next, many times without consulting the person involved, the family is off in

Dementia Care and Running Interference

Throughout her writing, caregiving expert Harriet Hodgson details her journey caring for her mother with memory disease. In her book “Alzheimer’s: Finding the Words,” excerpted here, she shares about needing to run interference for her mother, even when her mother lived in assisted living.   At least two out of three pe

Ambiguous Losses Come with Caregiving

I was my mother’s caregiver for nine years, my twin grandchildren’s guardian/caregiver for seven years, and am my disabled husband’s caregiver now. I’ve had this role for two years and there are more years to come. As time passed, I became aware of the losses associated with caregiving. These are ambiguous losses—painful losse

Aging in Place: Making Your Home Work for You

As we get older, many of our homes no longer work as well for us.  But most of us want to remain in the homes we love. Fortunately, there are many solutions.  There are trained experts in home modification all over the country.  There are many new tools to specifically address the issues of aging. Home Advisor has joined with t

9 Ways for Seniors to Get Involved!

Millions of aging Americans are reticent to give up on activities just because of their years on the calendar. Their refusal to fade into the sunset is spawning a number of clubs and groups across the country and all while protecting their health and longevity. Social engagement and meaningful activities for seniors help stave off mo

4 Parkinson’s Caregiving Insights

Nearly 1 million Americans are living with Parkinson’s disease, the nervous system disorder that disrupts body movement. Each year, more than 50,000 people in the country are diagnosed with the progressive motor condition that mainly affects older adults but can occur at any age. Parkinson’s disease gradually attacks nerve cells

National Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month

November is National Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month to help Americans unite in the fight against this chronic brain condition that progressively affects thinking, memory, and behavior. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia, an overall term that describes a group of symptoms associated with mental decline seve

Aging in Place: Technologies to Make It Happen

“Sue” was one of our dementia clients with a daughter who was ahead of the technology curve. Five years ago, when we were caring for her mom, she had a camera in her mother’s condo to check in on her and the at-home caregivers who came in to help her. Sue’s daughter was concerned about her mother’s ability to live safely at ho

Eldercare at Home: Can I Pay Someone to Play Cards with My Elderly Parents?

As adult children taking care of elderly parents, we often consume most of our caregiving time addressing the medical problems and physical limitations of our elderly parents who need help with bathing, medication management, housekeeping, or errand-running.  Stopping in after work or going over on the weekend to help out is about all

Care for Older People: 9 Tips for Getting Your Money’s Worth at the Doctor

As we get older, it seems, at least for many of us, that our trips to the doctor become more and more frequent.  To make things worse, our trips are no longer one-stop shops.  There’s a different doctor to see for every medical ailment affecting our bodies.  This means, of course, that we go to the cardiologist on one day, the neur